Wednesday, March 22, 2017

Save these Spring Dates

Old Man Winter is giving up the ghost very reluctantly this year, but we are confident that Spring is on the way, and we have been planning some outdoor activities to take advantage of the coming warm weather. Make a note of these dates and stay tuned for more details as the snow melts!

April 29. Battle of Ridgefield 240th anniversary commemoration and battle re-enactment.  Stop by the Library to learn more about the history of the battle and the era, including performances by period musicians.

May 5-6. Spring Stroll. Enjoy chalk art and other activities up and down Main Street, including a family concert on the lawn by Ray and Jay, the Friends of the Library children’s book sale, and previews of coming attractions.

May 14. We’ll see you at the Run Like a Mother 5K Race with information about our Noreen L. Papa: Mothers Live your Life programs and resources focused on health and wellness for women and others, funded by race sponsorships.


May 29.  Watch for our contingent in the annual Memorial Day Parade. We haven’t picked our theme yet, but it is sure to be festive!

Thursday, March 16, 2017

Finding your Next Read

Our librarians are always looking for ways to enhance our readers’ advisory services.  The Ridgefield Library online catalog now draws from NoveList, a trusted source of expert recommendations for help in finding that next good read.   

Click on the entry for any title to find read-alikes with an explanation of why the match has been chosen.  Find suggestions for other authors based on your reading interests.  Want to know the order of books in a favorite series?  Click on the entry for any series’ title, and all the books will be displayed in the proper order.   Do you like James Patterson novels because of their fast-paced quality or Paula McClain’s character-driven writing style?  You’ll find lists of other authors who capture these elements in their books.  This enhanced catalog content is available for children’s, teen, and adult fiction and non-fiction, as well as for audiobooks.

To explore the full content of NoveList, visit the Readers’ Resources page on our website. Here you’ll find book suggestions for all interests and all ages along with lists of award winners and discussion guides.


Finally, don’t hesitate to ask our staff for reading recommendations.  It’s what we love to do.

Contributed by Head of Adult Services Dorothy Pawlowski

Thursday, March 9, 2017

Sharing Across Generations

The Library is one of the few locations in town where residents of all ages come together in the same space, and we have created several programs to encourage positive intergenerational exchange.

On March 11th, our Teen Advisory Group will be on hand from 11:00 AM to 1:00 PM to help adults and senior citizens with their technology needs.  Just bring in the gadgets that drive you crazy such as cell phones, laptops and digital cameras and let our teens unlock their secret power! 

Several times a year, we host Reading Is a Family Affair, in which elementary school children and their parents read a selected title together, then come to the Library as a family to talk about it over a pizza dinner, courtesy of the Friends of the Library.


2017 is the 4th year of our Books Building Bridges intergenerational literature program with Ridgefield High School.  A book is selected from the English curriculum, adults and students both read it, then come together for discussions led by some of the students.  The different generational perspectives make for very interesting conversation! In November we will be reading “Pride and Prejudice” together as part of an extended commemoration of the 200th anniversary of Jane Austen’s death.

Thursday, March 2, 2017

Caring for Library Media

Regular borrowers of DVDs and audiobooks on CD know that from time to time they encounter a disc that doesn’t play properly. We have a special machine for polishing and cleaning discs, but we do not subject them to this treatment unless there is a reported problem, as the process shortens the useful life of the item. The effect is similar to what happens to fine china if it is run repeatedly through the harsh elements of hot water and strong detergent in a dishwasher – over time important surface elements are worn away.


To help us maintain these items in the best condition possible, we rely on borrowers to let us know of problems, so we can address these specific situations by cleaning, polishing or replacing discs as needed.  To make this easier, we are now inserting a form into the cases of DVDs and audiobooks to allow users to report problems when they return the item, without having to come to the Circulation Desk in person.  Just indicate on the form which disc(s) did not work properly and describe the nature of the problem (skipping, sticking, garbled sound, whatever). We’ll take it from there!  Thanks for your help.

Thursday, February 23, 2017

WSJ Article from Home with your Library Card

Did you miss the Wall Street Journal coverage of the Super Bowl?  Want to read Gear & Gadgets reviews or just curious about a WSJ article you heard about?

Did you know that you have free access to full text Wall Street Journal articles?  The Wall Street Journal from ProQuest is a research resource available on Library computers, from the Library’s website, ridgefieldlibrary.org and from researchitct.org.  It covers the Wall Street Journal Eastern edition from 1984 through current, and includes same day coverage.

This Wall Street Journal research product is different from the wsj.com online product in that photographs and illustrations are excluded, but the complete text of each article is available and it is printable and free.

To find the Wall Street Journal link on the Ridgefield Library website click on Research & Reference and then on Magazines & Newspapers or on Databases A-Z to find WSJ listed alphabetically. You will need to enter your Connecticut library barcode number. To help find your articles, we recommend doing an “Advanced Search” to search by keywords, subject headings, names of companies and people, and by publication date or a range of dates.


We hope you make use of this Wall Street Journal resource!

Contributed by Adult Services Librarian Christie Mitchell

Thursday, February 16, 2017

Wall Street Journal Articles Available from Home

Did you miss the Wall Street Journal coverage of the Super Bowl?  Want to read Gear & Gadgets reviews or just curious about a WSJ article you heard about?

Did you know that you have free access to full text Wall Street Journal articles?  The Wall Street Journal from ProQuest is a research resource available on Library computers, from the Library’s website, ridgefieldlibrary.org and from researchITct.org.  It covers the Wall Street Journal Eastern edition from 1984 through current, and includes same day coverage.

This Wall Street Journal research product is different from the wsj.com online product in that photographs and illustrations are excluded, but the complete text of each article is available and it is printable and free.

To find the Wall Street Journal link on the Ridgefield Library website click on Research & Reference and then on Magazines & Newspapers or on Databases A-Z to find WSJ listed alphabetically. You will need to enter your Connecticut library barcode number. To help find your articles, we recommend doing an “Advanced Search” to search by keywords, subject headings, names of companies and people, and by publication date or a range of dates.


We hope you make use of this Wall Street Journal resource!

Contributed by Adult Services Librarian Christie Mitchell

Friday, February 10, 2017

Tax Help Is Here!

The income tax filing season is upon us, and the Ridgefield Library can help!  We now have copies of the most common IRS and Connecticut state forms and instruction booklets available on the Upper Level near the Adult Services Desk.  If you are looking for less common forms or ones for other states, we can help you find and print out what you need.  The Government and Legal Reference page on our website also includes links to many useful resources.

On Thursday mornings through April 13, IRS trained and certified volunteers from the AARP Foundation’s Tax-Aide program will be available in the Library’s Dayton Program Room to offer free, individualized help to low and moderate income taxpayers, especially those 60 and older.  Income tax assistance is available by appointment only; call 203-438-4288 for an appointment and a list of all the documents you will need to bring with you.


Don’t forget to make a copy of your completed return for your files – we have copiers on the Upper Level and in the Commons on the Main Level, with the very modest charge of 20 cents per page. And if you experience “sticker shock” once you have finished your return, check out one of our many books that outline tax strategies for the self-employed, those planning for retirement and more!